PostMaster2018-08-22T14:21:31+00:00

As a manufacturer / wholesaler we do not sell directly to the public.
If you have a fence project we are happy to put you in contact with a trusted local installer.

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An Investment In Quality

A new fence is a large investment for a family, so you should consider the full cost of installing different types of fence posts. The classic wood post is the most economical but it begins weathering / diminishing performance. If you are planning on using a steel post, be sure to factor in the bracket clamps and post caps into the cost. When you include these parts it can cause a typical steel post to be more expensive than a PostMaster post.

PostMaster Round Steel Post Pressure Treated Pine
Material Specs 7’6″ PostMaster 16 Gauge 2-3/8″ x 8′ 4″x4″x8′ Pressure Treated Post
Post Cost $28.98 $20.97 $9.88
Bracket Cost (3 per Post) $8.26
Post Cap Cost (1 per Post) $0.58
Total Post Cost $28.98 $29.81 $9.88

Pricing presented is an estimate based on retail pricing in March 2018, actual pricing may vary.

Exceptional Performance

PostMaster is designed for more than just presenting a seamless fence, it is an investment in peace of mind. The PostMaster is designed to withstand up to 73 mph winds, and will not shrink, warp or rot like wood posts. We feel so confident in this product that we place a Lifetime Limited warranty on the post. As a company that has been in fencing for 55 years, you know we will be there if there ever is an issue.

PostMaster Round Steel Post Pressure Treated Pine
Wind Resistance 73 MPH 68 MPH 75 MPH at Install*
Structural Warranty Limited Lifetime No No
Post Easily Hidden From View YES No No
Will Not Shrink, Warp or Rot YES YES No

*After install the wood can warp, rot or shrink that can affect its wind resistance ability.

Installing a PostMaster Fence

If you are building the fence yourself or hiring a professional you will need the following items in order to create your ideal fence.

  • PostMasters that are tall enough to be sunk at least 24″ below ground and reach your desired fence height.
  • 2×4 Rails – 6′ fences typically use 3 rails
  • Fence Boards in whatever style you like . A board at least 4″ wide is needed to fully cover the PostMaster from view.
  • Corner Clips for attaching the rails at the corners.
  • #8 x 1-1/4″ Truss Screws, available at most hardware stores. 6 screws for each rail.
  • #8 x 3/4″ Truss Screw, Available at most hardware stores. 4 per each corner post needing to be covered.
  • #12 x 1/2″ Hex Head Screws, available at most hardware stores. 4 per gate post.
  • Concrete for each fence post.
  • Gate Hardware: Hinges, Latches, and Drop Rods for each gate

Step 1: Plan, Layout & Mark

Locate your property’s boundary lines.

Precisely mark the fence layout – it’s the critical first step in a quality installation. Mark the location of each terminal post with a stake (corner, end, and gate posts are considered terminal posts).

When using 8′ long 2×4 rails, inline posts should be spaced 97 1/2″ (8 feet + 1 1/2″) on center, ±1/8″. The exact spacing may be modified depending on rails used, fence height, and ground slope.

Place shorter sections at the corners or near gates or buildings to make the fence fit the length of the layout.

Step 2a: Locating and Setting the Corner, End, and Gate Posts

We cannot give exact measurements on how to set your posts since each location is different. The soil conditions play a big factor in determining the depths the post need to be set. A loose, sandy soil will need more post underground than a soil that is rockier. If you are unsure of how deep to set the post contact a local fence professional.

The following instructions are for a typical 6′ fence using a 7′ 6″ PostMaster.

Dig the Corner, End, and Gate post holes 6″ – 10″ in diameter and 30″ deep. The exact diameter and depth will be determined by local conditions.

The height of fence boards should be 8″ above the top of the top rail and 8″ below the bottom of the bottom rail with a 2″ gap at the bottom between the fence board and ground.

See Step 2b: Assembling Gate Posts before setting the gate posts into the holes.

Center the Corner, End, and Gate posts in the holes. Make sure the posts are plumb, square to the fence line and set to the correct height. Block and support the post to preserve post position as installation continues.

Fill the hole with concrete in a continuous pour, mounding the top to direct water away from the post.

Step 2b: Assembling Gate Posts

Make a Gate Post by fastening two PostMaster posts back to back with four #12 x 1/2″ gate post screws. Put one screw in each flange, 6″ below the upper edge. Put two screws in the flanges 6″ above the base of the bottom rail.

Place the assembled gate posts in their post holes, making sure that their rail pockets will line up with the adjacent posts when installed. Pour concrete as with the Corner and End posts.

Step 2c: Locating and Setting Line Posts

When the terminal and gate post concrete has hardened, stretch a string between them to set the line posts at the correct height.

Dig the Line Post holes, same as the holes made for Corner, End, and Gate Posts: 6″ – 10″ in diameter and 30″ deep. The exact diameter and depth will be determined by local conditions.

Place the line posts in the hole, ensuring that its rail pockets will line up with the adjacent posts when installed. Pour concrete as with Terminal Posts.

Step 3: Installing Rails

Once all posts are set, attach rails according to the selected fence style. Typical fence boards are positioned 2″ above ground level and top rails installed 8″ from the top of the boards. Bottom rails are attached 8″ above the board bottom and middle rails are centered between the top and bottom rails.
Determine where to attach rails. PostMaster posts have holes, 1″ on center to make it easier to align rails at either end. For rail adjustment references, use the pre-marked rail alignment scores spaced 6″ on center and starting 1/4″ from the top of the post.

Fasten each rail-end using three 8# x 1 1/4″ rail screws.

NOTE: If the ground slopes, be sure to cut both rail-ends diagonally to allow a flush fit against the rail pocket of the hat section. Post clips may be required for fastening.

Attach rails to Corner Posts, using one Post Clip per rail-end. Screw one #8 x 1 1/4″ rail screw through the flange and into the rail-end. Screw a second #8 x 1 1/4″ rail screw through the flange and the semi-circular post clip hole and into the rail-end.
Fasten the bottom edges of the top and middle rails to the post clip with two more #8 x 1 1/4″ rail screws.
For the bottom rail, position the post clip above rail so it can be screwed to the rail’s top edge.

Step 4: Installing Corner Post Covers

Note: Install 4″ cover boards before installing fence boards. Position the cover board against the backside of flanges and attach with ten #8 x 3/4″ cover screws: 5 screws through each flange.

4″ Cover Board

Line up the edge of the fence board with the flange edge. Attach the fence board by fastening five #8 x 3/4″ cover screws into the fence board through the flange, followed by five more screws into the adjacent flange.

6″ Cover Board

Line up the edge of fence board with the flange edge. Attach the fence board by fastening five #8 x 3/4″ cover screws into the fence board through the flange into the rail pocket.

Step 5: Installing Fence Boards

Attach fence boards to the rails according to your desired style, using either nails or screws.

Step 6: Line, End, and Gate Cover Boards

Line Post

Install 6″ cover boards after installing fence boards. Attach cover board by nailing into the rail on either side of the post.

End Post

Fasten a vertical 2 x 2 in rail pocket by nailing it through fence board. Attach cover board by nailing one side into 2 x 2 and the other side into fence rail.

Gate Post

Use the numbering system to identify the gate post pocket positions referenced in the following steps.

For Swing Out Gates

Attach a 2 x 2 in rail pocket #1 by fastening five #8 x 1 1/4″ rail screws into it through flanges from rail pocket #3.

Diagonally attach a 2 x 2 in rail pocket #4 by fastening five #8 x 1-1/4″ rail screws into it through flanges from rail pocket #2

Attach a 2×2 to a cover board. Install the cover board so that the 2×2 fits into rail pocket #3, and fasten the assembly in place by nailing into the 2×2 in rail pocket #4

For Swing-In Gates

Attach a 2×2 in rail pocket #1 by fastening five #8 x 1 1/4 inch rail screws into it through flanges from rail pocket #3. Screws should be evenly spaced down the post.

Drill two 5/8″ holes for hanger bolts in the hat section between rail pockets #3 and #4. The hanger bolt adjustment nuts will be installed against the hat section.

Cut a 2×2 to appropriate lengths for rail pocket #4. Attach by fastening #8 x 1-1/4″ rail screws into the 2×2 through flanges in rail pocket #2.

Cut a 2×2 to appropriate lengths for rail pocket #3 and nail to the cover board.
Install the assembly so the 2×2 fits into rail pocket #3, and fasten by nailing through cover board into the 2×2 in rail pocket #4.

Step 7: Install Gate Hardware

SWING-OUT GATE Use 8″ Ornamental strap hinge.

SWING-IN GATE Use hanger bolt with 8″ Ornamental strap hinge.

Where Do I Find The Corner Clips?

You can either order your clips from any retail store by requesting Master Halco Part #633675 or you can call Master Halco directly at 1.800.643.3623 and we will get them to you.

What PostMaster Fence Post Height Do I Need?

Master Halco has provided a basic reference chart for use in most 6 foot and 8 foot high fences.  This chart is meant to serve as basic guidance for most, but not all fences.  We strongly recommend that you discuss your fence design needs with a local Professional Fence Contractor or a local structural engineer as they are the most familiar with your local codes, ordinances and conditions and can help you determine the correct post length you need.

Overall Fence Height Post Height Maximum Post Spacing* Where To Buy
6 foot 7ft 6in 8ft Retailer (Stocked at Stores)**
6 foot 8ft 8ft Professional Fence Contractor
8 foot 10ft 4ft Professional Fence Contractor
8 foot 12ft 4ft Professional Fence Contractor

*Maximum allowable on center post spacing to maintain warranty
**Local Retailers may offer additional sizes. Check with the Special Order or Professional Desks for availability and pricing

What Depth do I set PostMaster?

As shown in our installation instructions we advise that the post be set at least 24 inches into the ground for standard 6 foot and 8 foot high fences. If you have concerns or questions about how to meet your local code requirements, Master Halco recommends you contact a local structural engineer to do a full evaluation before starting any construction. Master Halco has technical information sheets for engineers available upon request.

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